What is yoga therapy and how is it different from a one-to-one yoga session?

Yoga Therapy is the adaptation of yoga practices (such as movement, breathing and relaxation) to an individual’s needs and requirements. The yoga therapy process looks to help empower individuals to move towards their optimal health and wellbeing.

What makes yoga therapy distinct from a one-to-one yoga session is that it involves an assessment (of posture, movement and breathing). Time is also dedicated to find out a person’s interests in yoga therapy and form priorities and goals for the yoga therapy plan. The client takes away a scribed yoga therapy practice to continue with at home.

Usually a yoga therapist is a qualified and experienced yoga teacher who has then undertaken an additional yoga therapy diploma training programme.

 


How long is one session with you?

The Initial Consultation is 90 minutes. Follow-up Sessions are 60 minutes.


What would a yoga therapy session with you look like?

No two yoga therapy sessions are the same - it depends on each client and their needs. There is some structure and common elements to all sessions however:
In the Initial Consultation, the client and I will go through the Health Questionnaire and discuss what they are looking to get from yoga therapy. I will then often observe how the client stands, moves and breathes. We then decide what the priority is and shape some goals together to enable us to monitor change. Time is spent exploring some practices together, making sure the client feels comfortable and confident practising them. The practices are written up for the client to take home and continue with.


Do you also do home visits?

Home visits can sometimes be arranged at times for those who are unable to attend sessions in my practice and live in West London.


How long does it take to see/feel first results?

Clients often report that benefits can often be experienced directly after the first session. 3 to 5 sessions are initially recommended to monitor change or improvement, adapt, modify or build upon practices as needed, and to support motivation and confidence practising alone.


What if I have never done yoga before?

No prior experience of yoga is needed.


What is the difference between a public/private yoga class and yoga therapy?

A public yoga class is usually held in a yoga studio or in a venue that has been rented out by a yoga teacher. It is a class setting where the general public can attend and is facilitated by a yoga teacher. Numbers in a public yoga class can vary.

A private yoga class is a one-to-one yoga session with a yoga teacher. Some yoga teachers have additional training in different areas and may work therapeutically.

Yoga therapy is distinct from a private yoga class and a public yoga class. A yoga therapist is usually a qualified and experienced yoga teacher who has then undertaken an additional yoga therapy diploma training programme. The session is usually on a one-to-one basis, although some yoga therapists run small groups for individuals who experience the same type of health concerns. A yoga therapy session usually involves an assessment (of posture, movement and breathing). Time is also dedicated to find out a person’s interests in yoga therapy and form priorities and goals for the yoga therapy plan. The client takes away a scribed yoga therapy practice to continue with at home.


What is the difference between physiotherapy and yoga therapy?

Physiotherapy helps to restore movement and function when someone is affected by injury, illness or disability. Yoga therapy is not physiotherapy, although, as yoga therapists, we also look at posture, function and movement.

The key difference is that yoga therapy looks at the whole person not just at the physical body to help support more fulfilling living on all levels of being, mind and body. Some clients see a physiotherapist alongside a yoga therapist. On many occasions, I have consulted with, and worked collaboratively with, a client’s physiotherapist (osteopath or consultant) with the client’s consent to best support the client.


My doctor told me not to do yoga, would yoga therapy be OK?

Some yoga practices are indeed contraindicated for certain health issues but that doesn’t necessarily mean you can’t practise yoga. Seeing a yoga therapist on a one-to-one basis would be a good starting place so that the practices are adapted specifically for you and your needs. I would be interested to know why your doctor told you not to do yoga and what their concerns were about it. 


Is there a minimum number of sessions I have to book/come?

No, you don’t need to book a set amount of sessions but I do recommend having at least 3, after the first Initial Consultation, to monitor changes, any benefits, and to have the chance to modify or build upon the practices you are given to do on your own. 


Will the NHS or my private insurance pay for yoga therapy?

No, unfortunately, the NHS nor private health insurers currently pay for yoga therapy.


Do you have a cancellation policy?

Yes, a 24-hour notice period is required to cancel a session. Otherwise the full price of the session will still be charged.  


Where do you hold your yoga therapy sessions?

I see people for yoga therapy at evolve wellness centre in South Kensington. In some instances, I see people in their own homes.


What are the next steps if I want to work with you?

  • For an appointment in South Kensington at evolve wellness centre: contact evolve directly.

  • Alternatively, send an enquiry here on my website for alternative locations in West London.

    • I will follow up the website enquiry with a phone conversation to find out more information about how I might help you.

    • If you decide that you want to work with me, I will send you a Health Questionnaire, which you can either email back to me or bring on the day of the appointment. It serves as a basis of discussion around what you are interested in yoga therapy for.  

    • The initial session is 90 minutes. Follow-up sessions are 60 minutes.  

    • Sessions are often weekly, depending on individual needs.